Love them or hate them, talent shows can provide massive exposure for their hopeful contestants. Sure, 15 minutes of fame can quickly descend into abject humiliation, and the majority of wannabes just pass through the public psyche without even stirring so much as a cup of tea. But for every wave of deluded divas and misguided maestros we, the lucky public, inadvertently discover a hidden gem.

While watching TV talent shows most viewers simply zone out in a haze of light entertainment. However, some web-savvy entrepreneurial types take the views of ol’ high-trousers and his cronies very seriously indeed. What if one of the contestants really makes it big? The vast majority of talent show entrants are complete amateurs, whose shrill voices won’t have previously troubled anyone other than their budgerigar. This does mean, however, that should a contestant receive the Cinderella treatment – and become an overnight success – you can bet your lunch that they won’t have registered their domain name in preparation.

Enter the Cybersquatters! Cybersquatters prey upon rising stars that haven’t as yet realised their glowing potential. No sooner has the budding starlet endured the hoary glare of Mr Cowell’s toothy grin, and their unregistered domain names will have become the property of opportunist buyers. So when the time to launch a promotional website arrives, the latest singing sensation will have to buy their domain names at the seller’s price.

The latest victim of this predatory practise is Scottish singer Susan Boyle. The unlikely star with an amazing voice clearly didn’t anticipate her rapid ascent into the showbiz elite. Unfortunately, her lack of foresight, endearingly earnest as it may be, has resulted Ms Boyle losing out on a whole host of potential web addresses, including www.susanboyle.co.uk. Ironically, the domain name www.susanboyle.com isn’t owned by a cybersquatter, instead artist Susan K. Boyle must be delighted with the sudden rush of traffic that her site is no doubt experiencing.

The lesson here is simple. If you think that you have even the faintest glimmer of talent, or a profitable idea, make sure you register your potential domain names – before the cybersquatters clean you out! 123-reg offers a huge variety of domain names at some of the cheapest prices on the web.

Buy some domain names now

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6 Responses

  • margaret davidson

    Everyone should have a chance to show their talents not only for our pleasure but for the joy it gives the person concerned

    May 1, 2009 at 7:45 pm
  • TK

    Personally I think all name registrars etc should view these so called opertunistic cybersquaters as the criminals they are… Attempting to extort monnies for domains they have no use for other than to charge the legitimate entity an extortionate amount of money to release it. Adjudication can be simple, the legit user should be able to provide a couple forms of ID to prove they are who they say they are and the cybersquaters can usually be spotted by the sheer number of domains they have registered and parked on some pseudo search portal page. Do the cybersquaters add value to the net as a whole? Of course they don’t so ban them, and outlaw the practise in your Terms of Service.

    June 1, 2009 at 12:38 pm
  • Myrea Pettit

    For everyone who thinks they have been cybersquated there is recourse to action and as an encouragement to success if they make a genuine case. Please read this case file below there is

    http://www.adrforum.com/domains/decisions/105899.htm

    June 1, 2009 at 2:03 pm
  • Jay Stapley

    Susan Boyle in rehab, children reduced to tears on live TV, and their moments of crisis are preserved on film for all eternity….This is not funny anymore.

    Simon Cowell said today “This is all great news. We’re working on something very special for the next series; hopefully we can get one of the failed finalists to commit suicide as they leave the stage.”

    How long will this go on for? How long will we admit to watching it because it’s “car-crash TV” or “so naff it’s good” before the worst happens? What indeed is the worst that can happen?This is not funny anymore.

    It is impossible (and wrong!) to short-cut the process of becoming a performer, as Susan Boyle and the child have discovered. You need to learn your craft; you need to fail in safe environments, not on live TV before an audience of millions. One’s failures should not be preserved on film for ever; they should be allowed to happen in an obscure club in the provinces and consigned to oblivion and experience.

    This is not funny anymore. We condemn the ancients for their barbaric gladiatorial contests yet we sit happily before the modern equivalent with a tub of ice-cream and a bottle of wine and guffaw like any barbarian before us.

    This is not funny anymore.

    June 1, 2009 at 3:37 pm
  • Paul

    We have a client who is a ‘victim’ of cyber squatting and we are using the ADR, but I feel the ISPs should do more to revoke the domain purchase if there is an obvious claim.

    So 123-Reg what are you going to do to lead the way for genuine ‘owners’ of business names?

    June 10, 2009 at 4:24 pm
  • Paul

    Sorry, by ISP, I meant name registrars……..

    June 10, 2009 at 4:26 pm